Africa research news

Farming invented twice in Middle East, genomes study reveals. - Nature.com

Mon, 2016-06-20 15:07

Nature.com

Farming invented twice in Middle East, genomes study reveals.
Nature.com
Two Middle Eastern populations independently developed farming and then spread the technology to Europe, Africa and Asia, according to the genomes of 44 people who lived thousands of years ago in present-day Armenia, Turkey, Israel, Jordan and Iran ...

Exceptional women are being undervalued - News24

Mon, 2016-06-20 12:27

News24

Exceptional women are being undervalued
News24
They represent South Africa's largest demographic group – black women – that is the least represented in the country's higher education sector, according to the latest research and development survey. Amid growing calls to decolonise the ... In her ...

1 in 5 of the World's Plant Species are in Danger of Extinction – and it's our Fault - One Green Planet

Mon, 2016-06-20 11:47

One Green Planet

1 in 5 of the World's Plant Species are in Danger of Extinction – and it's our Fault
One Green Planet
Once the largest continuous ecosystem in North America, this sea of undulating grasses supported a diverse array of plants and animals, including millions of bison, as well as other grazers and predators and numerous plants species. Today ... One of ...

Megafauna mystery: What killed off the mastodons, mammoths, and giant sloths? - Christian Science Monitor

Mon, 2016-06-20 11:18

Christian Science Monitor

Megafauna mystery: What killed off the mastodons, mammoths, and giant sloths?
Christian Science Monitor
An Ice Age whodunit: Scientists are gathering clues about what caused a die off in giant prehistoric critters. ... So did humans hunt the big animals to extinction or did the changing climate do them in? 14 animals declared ... Perhaps the two were ...
Study reveals our ancestors lived with elephant-sized sloths, sabre-toothed catsThe Marshalltown

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Westerly grad to work with big cats - The Westerly Sun

Mon, 2016-06-20 10:41

The Westerly Sun

Westerly grad to work with big cats
The Westerly Sun
In July, two days after she turns 21, the Westerly resident will travel to South Africa and spend 16 days participating in the GoEco.org Wildlife Cat Sanctuary Program. She'll clean enclosures, gather and analyze research, lead tours for visitors and ...

Early humans in East Africa used poison-tipped bone arrows - The Hindu

Mon, 2016-06-20 08:32

Early humans in East Africa used poison-tipped bone arrows
The Hindu
Bone tools were used for hunting, and even as poison arrow tips, in eastern Africa over 13,000 years ago, according to scientists who studied bone artefacts discovered in the Kuumbi Cave in Zanzibar. Bone technology — such as its use as an arrow tip ...

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Africa: Good Research Must Impact Society, Says Mukeshimana - AllAfrica.com

Mon, 2016-06-20 07:16

AllAfrica.com

Africa: Good Research Must Impact Society, Says Mukeshimana
AllAfrica.com
The seventh Africa Agriculture Science Week (AASW) and the Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA) General Assembly convened in Kigali more than 3,000 delegates from across the continent and beyond. During the ... The New Times' Collins Mwai ...

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Palm oil shows need for socially aware research - SciDev.Net

Mon, 2016-06-20 06:08

SciDev.Net

Palm oil shows need for socially aware research
SciDev.Net
The reference to sustainability and science got me thinking that palm oil has brought prosperity to the countries in the global South that produce it. And yet it has ... Palm oil is pressed from the fruit of the oil palm tree which is indigenous to ...

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Cave holds earliest signs of fire-making in Europe - Science News for Students

Sun, 2016-06-19 11:40

Science News for Students

Cave holds earliest signs of fire-making in Europe
Science News for Students
He and his colleagues conclude that fire-making began in Africa, before moving north to the Middle East and Europe. Walker and ... They also found about 2,300 fragments of animal bones that showed signs of heating and charring. ... He's a biological ...

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Your gut instinct's right... weight gain isn't your fault - Express.co.uk

Sat, 2016-06-18 23:11

Express.co.uk

Your gut instinct's right... weight gain isn't your fault
Express.co.uk
Scientists studying the twins as part of cutting edge research into gut health believe these girls highlight the secret to both health and weight loss. Their research demonstrates that a key determinant of both weight and health is not what we eat, or ...

Ice Age mystery: What killed off the mastodons, mammoths, and giant sloths? - Christian Science Monitor

Sat, 2016-06-18 16:47

Christian Science Monitor

Ice Age mystery: What killed off the mastodons, mammoths, and giant sloths?
Christian Science Monitor
Scientists have long debated what may have happened and largely point to two possible culprits. ... The team sequenced ancient DNA from fossils found at sites across South America in order to trace the genetic history of populations of megafauna ...

and more »

What Should Vacationers Pack In Their Travel Medical Kit? - NPR

Sat, 2016-06-18 11:00

NPR

What Should Vacationers Pack In Their Travel Medical Kit?
NPR
You'll definitely need more supplies if you're headed for a place with mosquito-borne diseases like Zika — whether it's a beach in a tropical paradise, a South American jungle or a destination in India or Africa. For suggestions, we talked to three ...

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Africa: Why New-Fangled Mosquito Controls Should Not Replace Tried and Tested Methods - AllAfrica.com

Sat, 2016-06-18 08:54

Africa: Why New-Fangled Mosquito Controls Should Not Replace Tried and Tested Methods
AllAfrica.com
In the last 40 years of mosquito-borne viruses such as malaria, yellow fever and dengue, scientists have introduced myriad interventions to control the population of mosquitoes. This is because controlling mosquitoes has a large effect on controlling ...

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Congolese Uranium, Nazi Germany and the Race to Build the A-Bomb - Newsweek

Sat, 2016-06-18 08:10

Newsweek

Congolese Uranium, Nazi Germany and the Race to Build the A-Bomb
Newsweek
This position was shared by President Roosevelt and Winston Churchill, who had agreed that Britain should cooperate with the U.S. on the construction of the bomb; British scientists working on Britain's secret atomic bomb project—Tube Alloys—were ...

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Sir David Attenborough: giraffes are facing 'silent extinction' - Telegraph.co.uk

Sat, 2016-06-18 05:02

Telegraph.co.uk

Sir David Attenborough: giraffes are facing 'silent extinction'
Telegraph.co.uk
Giraffes are facing a 'silent extinction' with just 90,000 animals still roaming the African plains, far fewer than the endangered African Elephant, a new documentary warns. ... A new BBC documentary, narrated by Sir David Attenborough, followed a ...

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Archaeologists Discover Possible Homo Erectus Footprints in East Africa - History

Fri, 2016-06-17 20:52

History

Archaeologists Discover Possible Homo Erectus Footprints in East Africa
History
Some 800,000 years ago, one of modern man's prehistoric ancestors walked along the shore of a large lake in what is now Eritrea, in northeastern Africa. This individual's footprints, preserved in the sandy soil, were eventually buried under thousands ...

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Megafaunal mystery: What killed the mastodons, mammoths, and giant sloths? - Christian Science Monitor

Fri, 2016-06-17 20:40

Christian Science Monitor

Megafaunal mystery: What killed the mastodons, mammoths, and giant sloths?
Christian Science Monitor
Scientists have long debated what may have happened and largely point to two possible culprits. ... The team sequenced ancient DNA from fossils found at sites across South America in order to trace the genetic history of populations of megafauna ...

and more »

Bone artifacts suggest early adoption of poison-tipped arrow technology in Eastern Africa - Science Daily

Fri, 2016-06-17 20:24

Science Daily

Bone artifacts suggest early adoption of poison-tipped arrow technology in Eastern Africa
Science Daily
Their findings showed that the bone projectile points are likely to have been used for poison arrows, partly due to the slender and short nature of the arrow heads, and partly supported by a previous discovery of charcoal from the Mkunazi plant, which ...

South Sudan ivory seizure highlights Africa's 'ongoing poaching crisis' - Christian Science Monitor

Fri, 2016-06-17 19:13

South Sudan ivory seizure highlights Africa's 'ongoing poaching crisis'
Christian Science Monitor
It was very hard to prosecute people for selling ivory because the exceptions and loopholes were so large,” Jeff Flocken, North American regional director for the International Fund for Animal Welfare, told The Christian Science Monitor at the time ...

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Baby Elephant in Chains Shows How the Illegal Wildlife Trade Turns Animals Into Commodities - One Green Planet

Fri, 2016-06-17 15:50

One Green Planet

Baby Elephant in Chains Shows How the Illegal Wildlife Trade Turns Animals Into Commodities
One Green Planet
The illicit wildlife trade poses a serious threat to the survival of countless animal species around the globe. Pangolins (a little-known, scaly nocturnal animal) are the most widely illegally-traded mammal in the world. They are hunted for their meat ...